• K Krishnan

      Articles written in Proceedings – Section A

    • The Raman spectra of organic compounds - Part I. Methyl, ethyl,n-propyl andn-butyl alcohols

      K Krishnan

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      The Raman spectra of methyl alcohol, ethyl alcohol,n-propyl alcohol andn-butyl alcohol have been recorded using λ 2537 excitation. 35, 49, 45 and 51 Raman lines respectively have been identified in the spectra of these alcohols, in addition to the rotational ‘wings’. In each case, a large number of additional lines have been recorded. The existence of Raman lines with frequency shifts greater than 3800 cm.−1, first reported by Bolla in the spectrum of ethyl alcohol, has been confirmed. Similar high-frequency shift Raman lines have also been recorded in the spectrum of methyl alcohol. They have been assigned as combinations. Proper assignments have been given for the prominent Raman lines appearing in the spectra of these alcohols.

    • Raman spectra of organic compounds - Part II. Methyl borate

      K Krishnan

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    • Raman spectrum ofl-asparagine monohydrate

      K Krishnan R S Krishnan

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      The Raman spectrum ofl-asparagine monohydrate in the form of a single crystal has been recorded for the first time.λ 2537 excitation has been used. Fifty-three Raman frequency shifts have been recorded. They are grouped as follows: Eight Raman lines coming under the lattice spectrum, three Raman lines arising from low-frequency vibrations of the hydrogen bonds and the remaining forty-two arising from the internal oscillations of the asparagine molecule. Appropriate assignments have been given for the observed Raman lines.

    • The Raman spectrum of boric acid

      K Krishnan

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      The Raman spectrum of crystalline boric acid is recorded using mercuryλ2537 excitation. Fifteen Raman lines, three of them belonging to the lattice spectrum, are reported. Satisfactory assignments of all the observed Raman frequencies are made using the available X-ray crystal structure data. From the presence of a new high frequency Raman band at about 3420 cm.−1 it is suggested that there might be a small number of long, weak O-H....O hydrogen bonds in the crystal, in addition to the hydrogen bonds of moderate strength reported from X-ray diffraction data.

    • Urey-Bradley potential function for the in-plane vibrations of boric acid

      K Krishnan

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      The Urey-Bradley force constants for the in-plane vibrations of the boric acid molecule are calculated using the Wilson’s F-G matrix method. They are as follows: KO-H=5·23, KB-O=4·94, HBOH=0·36,$$H_{O\hat BO} = 0 \cdot 41$$, F00=0·68 and FBH=0·98 in units of 105 dynes/cm. Using the force constants, the frequencies are recalculated and the calculated values agree with the observed values satisfactorily. The in-plane vibrational frequencies of deuterated boric acid are also calculated and again satisfactory agreement with the observed values is found.

    • Influence of the hydrogen bond on the N-H stretching frequencies in amino-acids

      R S Krishnan K Krishnan

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      The spectra of glycine, its addition compounds and other amino-acids exhibit Raman lines in the region from 3250 cm.−1 to 2500 cm.−1 It has been shown that these lines cannot be assigned to N-H...O stretching vibrations, where the N atom has the covalency of three, but to N+-H...O stretching vibration where the N atom has the covalency of four. Using the data obtained with triglycine sulphate which has the largest number of N+-H...O bonds and whose H bond lengths are known, the correlation curve giving the relation between the N+-H...O stretching frequencies and the corresponding H bond lengths has been drawn. Using this correlation curve, the N+-H...O stretching frequencies appearing inα-glycine,γ-glycine, diglycine hydrochloride, diglycine hydrobromide,l-asparagine monohydrate anddl-alanine have been satisfactorily accounted for on the basis of the known hydrogen bond lengths in these substances.

    • Raman spectra of ferro-electric crystals - Part IV. Lithium hydrazinium sulphate (LiN2H5SO4)

      R S Krishnan K Krishnan

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      The Raman spectrum of lithium hydrazinium sulphate has been recorded both in the single crystal form and in aqueous solutions. The crystal exhibits thirty-eight Raman lines having the frequency shifts 52, 70, 104, 146, 174, 220, 260, 302, 350, 454, 470, 610, 630, 715, 977, 1094, 1115, 1132, 1177, 1191, 1260, 1444, 1493, 1577, 1630, 1670, 2205, 2484, 2553, 2655, 2734, 2848, 2894, 2939, 3028, 3132, 3290 and 3330 cm.−1 The aqueous solution gave rise to six Raman lines at 452, 980, 1050–1200, 1260, 1425 and 1570 cm.−1 apart from a maximum at 180 cm.−1 in the ‘wing’ accompanying the Rayleigh line. The observed Raman lines have been assigned as arising from the vibrations of the SO4 ion, N2H5+ ion, Li-O4 group, hydrogen bond and the lattice. The influence of the hydrogen bond on the N-H stretching vibrations has been pointed out. The various features of the observed spectrum strongly support the hypothesis that the NH3 group in the crystal is rotating around the N-N axis at room temperature.

    • Raman and infrared spectra of ethylene glycol

      K Krishnan R S Krishnan

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      The Raman spectrum of ethylene glycol has been investigated in the liquid and solid states and also in aqueous solutions. The infrared absorption spectrum of the liquid has been recorded. 27 Raman lines and 17 infrared maxima in the liquid state and 20 Raman lines in the solid state have been reported. Detailed vibrational assignments have been given. Two strong polarised Raman lines of the liquid which have no corresponding infrared absorption bands, and which disappear on solidification, have been attributed to the trans configuration of the glycol molecule. From a comparative study of the various spectra, it is concluded that in the liquid state, glycol exists as a mixture of the two rotational isomers (trans and gauche) whereas in the solid state only the gauche form is present. In very dilute aqueous solutions, the predominant molecular form is the gauche form.

    • Errata

      K Krishnan R S Krishnan

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