• G. Srinivasan

      Articles written in Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy

    • Pulsar activity and the morphology of supernova remnants

      V. Radhakrishnan G. Srinivasan

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      We use the recently introduced concept of a ‘window’ of magnetic field strengths in which pulsars can be active to explain the variation in morphology of supernova remnants. The striking difference between shell-type and filled-type remnants is attributed to differences in he magnetic field strengths of the neutron stars left by the respective Supernovae. Field strengths of a value permitting pulsar activity result in particle production and Crab-like centrally concentrated remnants. Other field values lead to strong magnetic dipole radiation and consequent shell formation (e.g. Cas A). Several apparent inconsistencies concerning pulsar-supernova associations appear to find a logical explanation on the basis of this hypothesis.

    • Evidence for a large population of shocked interstellar clouds

      V. Radhakrishnan G. Srinivasan

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      A 21 cm absorption measurement over a long path length free of the effects of differential galactic rotation indicates the existence of two distinct cloud populations in the plane. One of them consisting of cold, dense clouds has been well studied before. The newly found hot clouds appear to be at least five times more numerous. They have a spin temperature of ~ 300 K, an rms velocity of ~ 35 km s-1, twice the total mass, and hundred times the kinetic energy of the cold clouds. Over long path lengths, the hot clouds haveNH/kpc ~ 2 X 1021 cm-2 Kpc-1, and are estimated to have individual column densities ≤ 1020 cm-2. We propose that they are shocked clouds found only within supernova bubbles and that the cold clouds are found in the regions in-between old remnants, immersed in an intercloud medium. We conclude that the solar neighbourhood must be located between old supernova remnants rather than within one.

    • A new look at the birthrate of supernova remnan

      G. Srinivasan K. S. Dwarakanath

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      We have reanalysed a homogeneous catalogue of shell-type supernova remnants and we find that the radio data are consistent with a birthrate of one in 22±3 yr. Our approach is based on the secular decrease of surface brightness of the historical remnants whose ages are precisely known. The abovementioned birthrate is significantly higher than most previous estimates which range from one in 50–150 yr, and is consistent with the supernova rate in our galaxy derived from historical observations, as well as with recent estimates of the pulsar birthrate.

    • On the supernova remnants produced by pulsars

      G. Srinivasan D. Bhattacharya K. S. Dwarakanath

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      We conclude that pulsar-driven supernova remnants (SNRs) are extremely rare objects. Indeed an analysis of the known sample of plerions suggests a very low birthrate ∼ 1 in 240 years. Long-lived and bright plerions like the Crab nebula are likely to be produced only when the pulsar has an initial period ∼ 10–20 milliseconds and a field ∼ 1012 G. Such pulsars inside rapidly expanding shell remnants should also produce detectable plerions. The extreme rarity of SNRs with such hybrid morphology leads us to conclude that these pulsars must have been born with an initial period larger than ∼ 35–70 milliseconds.

    • Editorial

      G. Srinivasan

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    • Are many pulsars processed in binary systems?

      A. A. Deshpande R. Ramachandran G. Srinivasan

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      A detailed statistical analysis of pulsarcurrent is presented. The conclusions reached are the following: (1) The birthrate of pulsars is about one in 75 ± 15 years. (2) There is evidence forinjection of pulsars into the population of solitary pulsars. Such an injection is particularly pronounced in the magnetic field range 12 < logB < 12.6. (3) This is interpreted as due torecycled pulsars being released into the population. (4) We tentatively conclude that as much as 10 – 15% of all pulsars may have been born and processed in binary systems.

    • The progenitors of pulsars

      A. A. Deshpande R. Ramachandran G. Srinivasan

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    • Preface

      G. Srinivasan

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    • Stars: Their structure and evolution

      G. Srinivasan

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    • Molecular gas associated with the IRAS-vela shell

      Jayadev Rajagopal G. Srinivasan

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      We present a survey of molecular gas in theJ = 1 → 0 transition of12CO towards the IRAS Vela Shell. The shell, previously identified from IRAS maps, is a ring-like structure seen in the region of the Gum Nebula. We confirm the presence of molecular gas associated with some of the infrared point sources seen along the shell. We have studied the morphology and kinematics of the gas and conclude that the shell is expanding at the rate of ~ 13 km s-1 from a common center. We go on to include in this study the Southern Dark Clouds seen in the region. The distribution and motion of these objects firmly identify them as being part of the shell of molecular gas. Estimates of the mass of gas involved in this expansion reveal that the shell is a massive object comparable to a GMC. From the expansion and various other signatures like the presence of bright-rimmed clouds with head-tail morphology, clumpy distribution of the gas etc., we conjecture that the molecular gas we have detected is the remnant of a GMC in the process of being disrupted and swept outwards through the influence of a central OB association, itself born of the parent cloud.

    • The interstellar clouds of adams and blaauw revisited: An HI absorption study-I

      Jayadev Rajagopal G. Srinivasan K. S. Dwarakanath

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      This investigation is aimed at clarifying the nature of the interstellar gas seen in absorption against bright O and B stars. Towards this end we have obtained for the first time HI absorption spectra towards radio sources very close to the lines of sight towards twenty five bright stars previously studied. In this paper we describe the selection criteria, the details regarding our observations, and finally present the absorption spectra. In the accompanying paper we analyse the results and draw conclusions.

    • The interstellar clouds of adams and blaauw revisited: An HI absorption study-II

      Jayadev Rajagopal G. Srinivasan K. S. Dwarakanath

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      In the preceding paper (Paper I), we presented HI absorption spectra towards radio sources very close to the lines of sight towards twenty five bright stars against which optical absorption spectra had been obtained earlier, In this paper we analyse the results and draw some conclusions.

      To summarize briefly, in most cases we found HI absorption at velocities corresponding to the optical absorption features provided one restricted oneself to velocities ≲10 kms-1. At higher velocities we did not detect any HI absorption down to an optical depth limit of 0.1 (except in four cases which we attribute to gas in systematic motion rather than clouds in random motion). After discussing various scenarios, we suggest that this trend should perhaps be understood in terms of the high velocity interstellar clouds being accelerated, heated and ablated by expanding supernova remnants.

    • GMRT observations of interstellar clouds in the 21cm line of atomic hydrogen

      Rekhesh Mohan K. S. Dwarakanath G. Srinivasan Jayaram N. Chengalur

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      Nearby interstellar clouds with high (|ν|≥10km s−1) random velocities although easily detected in NaI and CaII lines have hitherto not been detected (in emission or absorption) in the HI 21cm line. We describe here deep Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) HI absorption observations toward radio sources with small angular separation from bright O and B stars whose spectra reveal the presence of intervening high random velocity CaII absorbing clouds. In 5 out of the 14 directions searched we detect HI 21cm absorption features from these clouds. The mean optical depth of these detections is ∼0.09 and FWHM is ∼10km s−1, consistent with absorption arising from CNM clouds.

    • A high galactic latitude HI 21 cm-line absorption survey using the GMRT: I. Observations and spectra

      Rekhesh Mohan K. S. Dwarakanath G. Srinivasan

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      We have used the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (GMRT) to measure the Galactic HI 21-cm line absorption towards 102 extragalactic radio continuum sources, located at high (|b| > 15°) Galactic latitudes. The Declination coverage of the present survey is δ}> - 45°. With a mean rms optical depth of ∼ 0.003, this is the most sensitive Galactic HI 21-cm line absorption survey to date. To supplement the absorption data, we have extracted the HI 21-cm line emission profiles towards these 102 lines of sight from the Leiden Dwingeloo Survey of Galactic neutral hydrogen. We have carried out a Gaussian fitting analysis to identify the discrete absorption and emission components in these profiles. In this paper, we present the spectra and the components. A subsequent paper will discuss the interpretation of these results.

    • A high galactic latitude HI 21 cm-line absorption survey using the GMRT: II. Results and interpretation

      Rekhesh Mohan K. S. Dwarakanath G. Srinivasan

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      We have carried out a sensitive high-latitude (|b| > 15°) HI 21 cm-line absorption survey towards 102 sources using the GMRT. With a 3σ detection limit in optical depth of ∼ 0.01, this is the most sensitive HI absorption survey. We detected 126 absorption features most of which also have corresponding HI emission features in the Leiden Dwingeloo Survey of Galactic neutral Hydrogen. The histogram of random velocities of the absorption features is well-fit by two Gaussians centered at V1sr ∼ 0 km s−1 with velocity dispersions of 7.6 ± 0.3 km s−1 and 21 ± 4 km s−1 respectively. About 20% of the HI absorption features form the larger velocity dispersion component. The HI absorption features forming the narrow Gaussian have a mean optical depth of 0.20 ± 0.19, a mean HI column density of (1.46 ± 1.03) × 1020 cm−2, and a mean spin temperature of 121 ± 69 K. These HI concentrations can be identified with the standard HI clouds in the cold neutral medium of the Galaxy. The HI absorption features forming the wider Gaussian have a mean optical depth of 0.04 ± 0.02, a mean HI column density of (4.3 ± 3.4) × 1019 cm−2, and a mean spin temperature of 125 ± 82 K. The HI column densities of these fast clouds decrease with their increasing random velocities. These fast clouds can be identified with a population of clouds detected so far only in optical absorption and in HI emission lines with a similar velocity dispersion. This population of fast clouds is likely to be in the lower Galactic Halo.

  • Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy | News

    • Continuous Article Publication

      Posted on January 27, 2016

      Since January 2016, the Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy has moved to Continuous Article Publishing (CAP) mode. This means that each accepted article is being published immediately online with DOI and article citation ID with starting page number 1. Articles are also visible in Web of Science immediately. All these have helped shorten the publication time and have improved the visibility of the articles.

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