• A S Venkatesh

      Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science

    • Mineralogy and geochemistry of banded iron formation and iron ores from eastern India with implications on their genesis

      Subrata Roy A S Venkatesh

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      The geological complexities of banded iron formation (BIF) and associated iron ores of Jilling–Langalata iron ore deposits, Singhbhum–North Orissa Craton, belonging to Iron Ore Group (IOG) eastern India have been studied in detail along with the geochemical evaluation of different iron ores. The geochemical and mineralogical characterization suggests that the massive, hard laminated, soft laminated ore and blue dust had a genetic lineage from BIFs aided with certain input from hydrothermal activity. The PAAS normalized REE pattern of Jilling BIF striking positive Eu anomaly, resembling those of modern hydrothermal solutions from mid-oceanic ridge (MOR). Major part of the iron could have been added to the bottom sea water by hydrothermal solutions derived from hydrothermally active anoxic marine environments. The ubiquitous presence of intercalated tuffaceous shales indicates the volcanic signature in BIF.

      Mineralogical studies reveal that magnetite was the principal iron oxide mineral, whose depositional history is preserved in BHJ, where it remains in the form of martite and the platy hematite is mainly the product of martite. The different types of iron ores are intricately related with the BHJ. Removal of silica from BIF and successive precipitation of iron by hydrothermal fluids of possible meteoric origin resulted in the formation of martite-goethite ore. The hard laminated ore has been formed in the second phase of supergene processes, where the deep burial upgrades the hydrous iron oxides to hematite. The massive ore is syngenetic in origin with BHJ. Soft laminated ores and biscuity ores were formed where further precipitation of iron was partial or absent.

    • ‘Indicator’ carbonaceous phyllite/graphitic schist in the Archean Kundarkocha gold deposit, Singhbhum orogenic belt, eastern India: Implications for gold mineralization vis-a-vis organic matter

      P R Sahoo A S Venkatesh

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      Carbonaceous rocks in the form of graphitic schist and carbonaceous phyllite are the major host rocks of the gold mineralization in Kundarkocha gold deposit of the Precambrian Singhbhum orogenic belt in eastern India. The detection of organic carbon, essentially in the carbonaceous phyllite and graphitized schist within the Precambrian terrain, is noted from this deposit. A very close relationship exists between gold mineralization and ubiquitous carbonaceous rocks containing organic carbon that seems to play a vital role in the deposition of gold in a Precambrian terrain in India and important metallogenetic implications for such type of deposits elsewhere. However, the role played by organic matter in a Precambrian gold deposit is debatable and the mechanism of precipitation of gold and other metals by organic carbon has been reported elsewhere. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results and total organic carbon (TOC) values suggest that at least part of the organic material acted as a possible source for the reduction that played a significant role in the precipitation of gold. Lithological, electron probe analysis (EPMA), fluid inclusions associated with gold mineralization, Total Carbon (TC), TOC and FTIR results suggest that the gold mineralization is spatially and genetically associated with graphitic schist, carbonaceous phyllite/shale that are constituted of immature organic carbon or kerogen. Nano-scale gold inclusions along with free milling gold are associated with sulfide mineral phases present within the carbonaceous host rocks as well as in mineralized quartz-carbonate veins. Deposition of gold could have been facilitated due to the organic redox reactions and the graphitic schist and carbonaceous phyllite zone may be considered as the indicator zone.

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