• C M Sharma

      Articles written in Journal of Biosciences

    • Space remote sensing for spatial vegetation characterization

      Shirish A Ravan P S Roy C M Sharma

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      The study area, Madhav National Park (MP) represents northern tropical dry deciduous forest. The national park, due to its unique location (nearest to township), is under tremendous biotic pressure. In order to understand vegetation structure and dynamics, vegetation mapping at community level was considered important. Prolonged leafless period and background reflection due to open canopy poses challenge in interpretation of satellite data. The vegetation of Madhav National Park was mapped using Landsat TM data. The ground data collected from sample points were subjected to TWINSPAN analysis to cluster sample point data into six communities. The vegetation classification obtained by interpretation (visual and digital) of remote sensing data and TWINSPAN were compared to validate the vegetation classification at community level. The phytosociological data collected from sample points were analysed to characterize communities. The results indicate that structural variations in the communities modulate spectral signatures of vegetation and form basis to describe community structure subjectively and at spatial level.

    • Variation in carbon stocks on different slope aspects in seven major forest types of temperate region of Garhwal Himalaya, India

      C M Sharma Sumeet Gairola N P Baduni S K Ghildiyal Sarvesh Suyal

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      The present study was undertaken in seven major forest types of temperate zone (1500 m a.s.l. to 3100 m a.s.l.) of Garhwal Himalaya to understand the effect of slope aspects on carbon (C) density and make recommendations for forest management based on priorities for C conservation/sequestration. We assessed soil organic carbon (SOC) density, tree density, biomass and soil organic carbon (SOC) on four aspects, viz. north-east (NE), north-west (NW), south-east (SE) and south-west (SW), in forest stands dominated by Abies pindrow, Cedrus deodara, Pinus roxburghii, Cupressus torulosa, Quercus floribunda, Quercus semecarpifolia and Quercus leucotrichophora. TCD ranged between 77.3 CMg ha−1 on SE aspect (Quercus leucotrichophora forest) and 291.6 CMg ha−1 on NE aspect (moist Cedrus deodara forest). SOC varied between 40.3 CMg ha−1 on SW aspect (Himalayan Pinus roxburghii forest) and 177.5 CMg ha−1 on NE aspect (moist Cedrus deodara forest). Total C density (SOC+TCD) ranged between 118.1 CMg ha−1 on SW aspect (Himalayan Pinus roxburghii forest) and 469.1 CMg ha−1 on NE aspect (moist Cedrus deodara forest). SOC and TCD were significantly higher on northern aspects as compared with southern aspects. It is recommended that for C sequestration, the plantation silviculture be exercised on northern aspects, and for C conservation purposes, mature forest stands growing on northern aspects be given priority.

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