• N S Rathore

      Articles written in Proceedings – Animal Sciences

    • Wing microsculpturing in the small house cockroach,Supella longipalpa (Dictyoptera, Biattidae)

      M L Roonwal N S Rathore

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      Elytra and wings ofSupella longipalpa (Fabricius) show sexual dimorphism in size, being well developed in males and less so in females. The following eight types of microscuipturing elements (including hairs) occur on both the upper and lower surfaces, varying in size (0.5–100 μm) and density (a few to 1000/mm2): Pimpules, papilllae, rods, microsetae, hairs (setae or macrotrichia of authors), polygons, parallel ridges and an irregular reticulum. The nomenclature adopted is mainly based on termites where these structures have been studied in great detail. Comparison is made with the Isoptera, Embioptera and Zoraptera. The biological and ecological consequences of microscuipturing are discussed.

    • Wing microsculpturing in the Brazilian termite family Serritermitidae (Serritermes serrifer, Isoptera), and its bearing on phylogeny

      M L Roonwal N S Rathore

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      The results of our studies on the Brazilian family Serritermitidae are presented here. Microsculpturing is simple and consists of a few rows of small, tongue-shaped papillae on the anterior and posterior wing margins and a few rows of angular arrowheads in the anterior one-third of the wings. Hairs are almost absent, a few small ones being scattered on some of the veins. The bearing of wing microsculpturing on the phylogeny of the Serritermitidae is discussed. It is concluded that the family arose as a lone sideline from the common ancient rhinotermitid stock. The other line from this stock gave rise to the Stylotermitidae on the one hand and the Rhinotermitidae on the other.

    • Wing microsculpturing in the termite genusAmitermes (Termitidae, Amitermitinae)

      M L Roonwal N S Rathore

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      Wing microsculpturing has been described in the genusAmitermes. It occurs on the upper and lower wing surfaces and is composed of a single row of small (3–5 μm long), thorny papillae at the anterior margin and numerous micrasters all over the wing membrane (size 6–8 μm×5–7 μm; density 9200–9600/mm2). The micrasters are with 5–8 arms and of the complex type (types V–X). No arrowheads are present. The position ofAmitermes is discussed in the general scheme of termite microsculpturing. Comparison is also made with the condition in the Zoraptera, Embioptera and the Blattoidea.

    • Wings and wing-microsculpturing in the termite family Indotermitidae (Indotermes, Isoptera), and their bearing on phylogeny

      M L Roonwal N S Rathore

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      The wings and wing-microsculpturing, hitherto either unknown or poorly known, in the small, rare family Indotermitidae, is described here in imagoes ofIndotermes rongrensis. Wings are transparent, colourless and weakly hairy; wing venation is described. Microsculpturing on wings consists of a row of small, pointed papillae at the anterior margin and a dense carpet (3100–3800/mm2) of minute (1–6 μm) simple, nonasteroid micrasters on both the membranes. The phylogeny of the Indotermitidae is discussed. It arose as a lone branch (with 3-segmented tarsi) from the initially 4-segmented ancient Termitidae stock.

    • Wing microsculpturing in two arabian species of termite genusAmitermes (Termitidae, Amitermitinae)

      M L Roonwal N S Rathore

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      To understand the intra-generic variability of wing microsculpturing inAmitermes (hitherto known in a single species,Amitermes belli), two other species from Arabia (Amitermes messinae andAmitermes sp.) were studied. Microsculpturing consists of two elements—papillae and micrasters. There is an intra-generic range of complexity in micrasters, from the simple nonasteroids to the complex asteroids. The general pattern conforms to the condition in the subfamily Amitermitinae as a whole.

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