• Mewa Singh

      Articles written in Proceedings – Animal Sciences

    • Establishment of home range, intraspecific and interspecific relations in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) under infantinfant rearing conditions

      Raghubir Singh Pirta Mewa Singh

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      Twelve rhesus infants, reared in two groups in a forest habitat. Were observed for more than one year to study their reactions to conspecifics and the effect on home range size. The infants exhibited behaviours characteristic of wild rhesus monkeys in the absence of any prior physical exposure to their conspecifics. Both peer groups established intra- and intergroup dominance hierarchies. They remained aloof from wild rhesus monkeys and showed xenophobia to stranger infants. Their home ranges increased with age and rearing experience. No change was observed in home ranges after adding more individuals.

    • Changing patterns of behaviour during the early stages of bonnet monkeyMacaca radiata

      Mewa Singh P Prakash Raghubir Singh Pirta

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      The behaviour of forty infants in five free-living groups of bonnet monkeys (Macaca radiata), was studied from birth to fifteen months of age. The total age period was divided into seven age-levels. The percentage of 20-sec intervals for each category and pattern of behaviour is reported for each age-level. With the growing up of the infant, the environment-oriented behaviours increased, whereas interactions with the mother decreased.

    • Changes in home ranges of rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) groups living in natural habitats

      Raghubir Singh Pirta Mewa Singh

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      Changes in home range size in 7 groups of rhesus monkeys were observed in urban and forest habitats in north India. In three groups home range size decreased due to either emigration or trapping of the alpha male. The average reduction in home range size was 30.48%. In one group the home range decreased from 1·12 km2 to 0·46 km2 after the removal of all group members except alpha male. The home ranges of 3 groups increased slightly due to disturbance caused (a) by elephants, (b) by trapping and (c) by conspecific group. The increase in the home range was for a short period (less than 15 days) as long as the disturbing variable was present. However, the decrease in home range due to loss of alpha male was almost permanent. The importance of the personality of alpha male and his personal experiences in the maintenance of home range has been discussed.

    • Differences in home ranges of rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) groups living in three ecological habitats

      Raghubir Singh Pirta Mewa Singh

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      Field observations were carried out on rhesus monkeys living in Asarori Forest, Chakia Forest, and temples. Data on group size, group composition and socionomic sex-ratios were obtained. An average home range size in these three habitats was fouad to be 5·18 km2 1·152 km2 and 0·017 km2 respectively. A positive correlation was found between group size and home range size in the Asarori Forest. Core areas were absent inside the home ranges in Chakia Forest. The average core area in other 2 habitats was 0·48 km2 and 0·009 km2 in Asarori Forest and temples respectively. The variability in home ranges and core areas is analysed in terms of differences in ecological conditions.

    • Inherited and rearing components of aggressive dominance and autonomic reactivity in the rat

      Sunitha Shankar Mewa Singh

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      On the basis of their scores in the open field test apparatus and ‘limited access’ competition, rats were divided into high and low aggressive and high and low reactive lines. Intrastrain breeding experiments were conducted across 3 generations to determine the heritability of aggressive behaviour and reactivity. In each generation, the animals of each strain were reared under ‘normal’, ‘crowded’ and ‘food restricted’ conditions to determine the extent of the influence of rearing environment on these behaviours. The genetic and environmental contributions to aggression and reactivity were further investigated through reciprocal cross matings and foster rearing. In most of the cases, environmental factors showed significant but varied and unpredictable influences, whereas the genetic factors were more consistent in their effects.

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