• Petrography and petrogenesis of some Indian basaltic achondrites derived from the HED parent body: Insights from electron microprobe analyses

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    • Keywords

       

      Indian achondrites; HED clan; petrography; mineral chemistry; petrogenesis.

    • Abstract

       

      Three Indian achondrites, viz., Bholghati howardite, Lohawat howardite and Pipliya Kalan eucrite and two other achondrites, viz., Bé ré ba eucrite and Johnstown diogenite are studied for their petrography and mineral chemistry. All these achondrites are derived from the HED parent body. Both Bholghati and Lohawat howardites are polymict breccias and contain pieces of eucrites and diaogenites (lithic clasts), pyroxene and minor olivine as mineral clasts, and small proportion of ilmenite and pure iron metal. Eucrite clasts are noncumulate basaltic in nature, whereas diogenite clasts are mostly composed of orthopyroxene with minor clinopyroxene and anorthite. Both howardite samples contain orthopyroxene, pigeonite and augite. Notable characteristics observed in Lohawat howardite include crystallization of orthoenstatite first at a high-temperature followed by ferrosilite, pigeonite olivine and augite from a basaltic melt. Piplia Kalan eucrite is noncumulate, unbrecciated and basaltic in nature and display ophitic/sub-ophitic or hypidiomorphic textures. It contains ∼60% pyroxenes (clinoenstatite and pigeonite) and ∼40% plagioclase feldspars (bytownite to anorthite). The observed mineralogy in the Piplia Kalan eucrite suggests its crystallization from a high-temperature basaltic melt crystallized at low pressure. Two other achondrite samples, viz., Bé ré ba eucrite and Johnstown diogenite are also studied. The Bé ré ba eucrite shows cumulate nature which is probably formed by small-degree melts of ilmenitebearing gabbro, whereas the Johnstown diogenite crystallized from a slow cooling of a Ca-poor basaltic melt derived from cumulates formed from the magma ocean, similar to the origin of the noncumulate eucrites.

    • Author Affiliations

       

      Rajesh K Srivastava1

      1. Centre of Advanced Study, Department of Geology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005, India.
    • Dates

       
  • Journal of Earth System Science | News

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