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    • Keywords

       

      Meridional temperature gradient; Atmospheric Infra Red Sounder (AIRS) data; Indian summer monsoon; outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR).

    • Abstract

       

      To investigate the temperature changes at 100 hPa over Indian region from Arabian Sea (AS) to Bay of Bengal (BOB), analysis is performed using Atmospheric Infra Red Sounder (AIRS) temperature and outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) data of 9 years (2003–2011). Fine-scale temperature variations have been studied and shown for summer (March–April–May, MAM), summer monsoon (June–July–August–September, JJAS) and winter (November–December–January–February, NDJF) months. Similarities and differences in the latitudinal and longitudinal variation of temperature and the possible causes have been examined. During MAM and NDJF, the temperature increases latitudinally by ∼2–3 K and ∼4–5 K from 3.5° to 20.5°N, respectively. However, the temperature decreases by ∼2.0–2.5 K during JJAS. A similar contrasting behaviour is observed in latitudinal temperature gradient. For MAM and NDJF, the gradient decreases from ∼0.18 to ∼0.14 K/deg and ∼0.25 to ∼0.18 K/deg, respectively, as we move longitudinally from 60° to 90°E; however, for JJAS, it increases from ∼0.10 to ∼0.14 K/deg over the same longitudes. It is found that latitudinal temperature gradient for NDJF is larger by about a factor of 1.5. Analysis suggests latitudinal change in temperature occurs due to low OLR (proxy of convection) and its northward progression during summer monsoon. Correlation coefficient (𝑅_xy) between OLR and temperature is computed latitudinally (3.5° to 20.5°N) at different longitudes and during JJAS (monsoon months), 𝑅xy is negative (∼−0.73) over 60° and 70°E longitudes, but it turns positive (∼0.92) over 80° and 90°E longitudes (which is convectively active region), suggesting a close association between low temperature and low OLR. Land–sea contrast is also observed in temperature at 100 hPa with a slight increase (∼0.5 K) from sea to land.

    • Author Affiliations

       

      A Gupta1 2 S K Dhaka1 V Panwar2 3 R Bhatnagar1 V Kumar1 2 Savita M Datta4 S K Dash5

      1. Department of Physics, Rajdhani College, University of Delhi, New Delhi 110 015, India.
      2. Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, New Delhi 110 007, India.
      3. Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011, Japan.
      4. Maitreyi College, University of Delhi, New Delhi 110 021, India.
      5. Centre for Atmospheric Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110 061, India.
    • Dates

       
  • Journal of Earth System Science | News

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