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      https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jbsc/034/02/0251-0261

    • Keywords

       

      Bacterial blight resistance; DNA polymorphism; gene expression analysis; physical mapping; resistance gene analogues; rice

    • Abstract

       

      Rice is the first cereal genome with a finished sequence and a model crop that has important syntenic relationships with other cereal species. The objectives of our study were to identify resistance gene analogue (RGA) sequences from chromosome 11 of rice, understand their expression in other cereals and dicots by in silico analysis, determine their presence on other rice chromosomes, and evaluate the extent of polymorphism and actual expression in a set of rice genotypes. A total of 195 RGAs were predicted and physically localised. Of these, 91.79% expressed in rice, and 51.28% expressed in wheat, which was the highest among other cereals. Among monocots, sugarcane showed the highest (78.92%) expression, while among dicots, RGAs were maximally expressed in Arabidopsis (11.79%). Interestingly, two of the chromosome 11-specific RGAs were found to be expressing in all the organisms studied. Eighty RGAs of chromosome 11 had significant homology with chromosome 12, which was the maximum among all the rice chromosomes. Thirty-one per cent of the RGAs used in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification showed polymorphism in a set of rice genotypes. Actual gene expression analysis revealed post-inoculation induction of one RGA in the rice line IRBB-4 carrying the bacterial blight resistance gene Xa-4. Our results have implications for the development of sequence-based markers and functional validation of specific RGAs in rice.

    • Author Affiliations

       

      Irfan A Ghazi1 2 3 Prem S Srivastava2 Vivek Dalal1 Kishor Gaikwad1 Ashok K Singh4 Tilak R Sharma1 Nagendra K Singh1 Trilochan Mohapatra1

      1. National Research Centre on Plant Biotechnology, Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi 110 012, India
      2. Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Science, Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi 110 062, India
      3. Department of Plant Sciences, School of Life Sciences, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500 046, India
      4. Division of Genetics, Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi 110 012, India
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  • Journal of Biosciences | News

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