• The reactive oxygen species network pathways: an essential prerequisite for perception of pathogen attack and the acquired disease resistance in plants

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      https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jbsc/031/03/0389-0404

    • Keywords

       

      Disease resistance; gene expression; pathogens; ROS; signal transduction

    • Abstract

       

      Availability of complete Arabidopsis(Arabidopsis thaliana) and rice(Oryza sativa) genome sequences, together with molecular recourses of functional genomics and proteomics have revolutionized our understanding of reactive oxygen species (ROS) signalling network mediating disease resistance in plants. So far, ROS have been associated with aging, cellular and molecular alteration in animal and plant cells. Recently, concluding evidences suggest that ROS network is essential to induce disease resistance and even to mediate resistance to multiple stresses in plants. ROS are obligatory by-products emerging as a result of normal metabolic reactions. They have the potential to be both beneficial and harmful to cellular metabolism. Their dual effects on metabolic reactions are dosage specific. In this review we focus our attention on cellular ROS level to trigger beneficial effects on plant cells responding to pathogen attack. By exploring the research related contributions coupled with data of targeted gene disruption, and RNA interference approaches, we show here that ROS are ubiquitous molecules of redox-pathways that play a crucial role in plant defence mechanism. The molecular prerequisites of ROS network to activate plant defence system in response to pathogen infections are here underlined. Bioinformatic tools are now available to scientists for high throughput analysis of cellular metabolisms. These tools are used to illustrate crucial ROS-related genes that are involved in the defence mechanism of plants. The review describes also the emerging findings of ROS network pathways to modulate multiple stress resistance in plants.

    • Author Affiliations

       

      Simeon O Kotchoni1 2 Emma W Gachomo3

      1. Department of Plant Molecular Biology, Institute of Botany, Kirschallee 1, University of Bonn - D-53115, Germany
      2. Department of Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV - 26506, USA
      3. Institute for Plant Diseases, Nussallee 9, University of Bonn - D-53115, Germany
    • Dates

       
  • Journal of Biosciences | News

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