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      Permanent link:
      https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/boms/040/01/0201-0212

    • Keywords

       

      Carbon additives; polysulphone; composite membranes; surface properties; mechanical properties; MG-63 cells viability.

    • Abstract

       

      This study presents a detailed evaluation of the impact of carbon fibrous materials on the physicochemical properties of polysulphone (PSU) membranes and their preliminary osteoblast-like cells response in vitro. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and short carbon fibres (SCFs) were incorporated into PSU and membranes were produced by the phase inversion method. Then, the physicochemical properties of the membranes’ surface were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to evaluate microstructure and porosity. Surface properties such as roughness, wettability and surface energy were evaluated using atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact profilometry and a goniometer, respectively. The presence of carbon fibrous additives in the PSU matrix improved its hydrophilicity. Porosity and topography of the PSU membranes were also changed upon incorporation of carbon additives. The mechanical properties of the PSU membranes were improved after SCF addition. All physicochemical properties of the obtained composite membranes had significant impact on the osteoblast-like cells response. Preliminary viability tests indicated biocompatibility of all membranes.

    • Author Affiliations

       

      ALICJA WEDEL-GRZENDA1 ANETA FRACZEK-SZCZYPTA1 MAURICIO TERRONES2 3 ANA LAURA ELÍAS2 MALGORZATA LEKKA4 ELZBIETA MENASZEK5 STANISLAW BLAZEWICZ1

      1. AGH-University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics, Department of Biomaterials, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow, Poland
      2. The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Physics and Center for 2-Dimensional and Layered Materials, 104 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802, USA
      3. Shinshu University, Research Center for Exotic Nanocarbons (JST), Wakasato 4-17-1, Nagano-city 380-8553, Japan
      4. The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences; Department of Experimental Physics of Complex Systems, Laboratory of Biophysical Microstructures, Radzikowskiego 52, 31-342 Krakow, Poland
      5. Collegium Medicum, Jagiellonian University, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Cytobiology, Medyczna 9, 30-068 Krakow, Poland
    • Dates

       

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