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      https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/boms/039/02/0573-0586

    • Keywords

       

      Alumina; diamond; ceramic coatings; tribology.

    • Abstract

       

      At present alumina is themost widely used bio-ceramic material for implants.However, diamond surface offers very good solid lubricant for different machinery, equipment including biomedical implants (hip implants, knee implants, etc.), since the coefficient of friction (COF) of diamond is lower than alumina. In this tribological study, alumina ball was chosen as the counter body material to show better performance of the polycrystalline diamond (PCD) coatings in biomedical load-bearing applications.Wear and friction data were recorded for microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition (MWCVD) grown PCD coatings of four different types, out of which two sampleswere as-deposited coatings, one was chemo-mechanically polished and the other diamond sample was made free standing by wet-chemical etching of the silicon wafer. The coefficient of friction of the MWCVD grown PCD against Al$_2$O$_3$ ball under dry ambient condition was found in the range of 0.29–0.7, but in the presence of simulated body fluid, the COF reduces significantly, in the range of 0.03–0.36. The samples were then characterized by Raman spectroscopy for their quality, by coherence scanning profilometer for surface roughness and by electron microscopy for their microstructural properties. Alumina balls worn out ($14.2 \times 10^{−1}$ mm$^3$) very rapidly with zero wear for diamond ceramic coatings. Since the generation of wear particle is the main problem for load-bearing prosthetic joints, it was concluded that the PCD material can potentially replace existing alumina bio-ceramic for their bettertribological properties.

    • Author Affiliations

       

      ANURADHA JANA1 2 NANDADULAL DANDAPAT1 MITUN DAS1 VAMSI KRISHNA BALLA1 SHIRSHENDU CHAKRABORTY1 RAJNARAYAN SAHA2 AWADESH KUMAR MALLIK1

      1. CSIR–Central Glass & Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata 700032, India
      2. Department of Chemistry, National Institute of Technology, Durgapur 713209, India
    • Dates

       
  • Bulletin of Materials Science | News

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